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An Encounter In Tehran

OUR STORY

In the winter of 2000, during a visit to Tehran, I met a young accounting student who lived in my parents’ neighborhood. Since I was also an accounting student in the US, we compared notes. She told me that she had a hard time understanding accounting concepts because their translated textbooks were too literal. 

Later when I quit my accounting job in California and moved to New York, I began pursuing my passion of translation. I realized that the same need existed here in the US. So my company’s vision was born. 

I felt for the Iranians (and Americans) who don’t have access to high quality translation and interpretation and I understood their frustration. Early in life, I had the privilege of studying the French language at a prestigious school in Iran and later I continued my love of languages with learning English in the US. I felt how others who did not have the same privilege are missing out on the benefits that foreign languages can offer.

Today, Farsi Translation Center is still loyal to that vision. We have always treated our clients with compassion. A commitment born in Tehran’s post-war of 1988 with my first translation project. We carry that same dedication wherever we go.

Learn About ATA Farsi Certification Program

Dear Colleagues: 

The business of translation of Farsi in the US has become questionable. Due to the lack of a standardized certification, many individuals who do not possess adequate translation skills have entered this profession. The translations and interpretations produced by these non-qualified translators have considerably lowered the quality of Farsi translation products and interpretation services in the US compared to other countries such as Canada or Australia. 

The American Translators Association (ATA) is the sole organization in the US that offers translator certifications. Given that there is no standardized certification procedure for the Farsi-English pairing by the ATA, we have formed a volunteer workgroup and have initiated the process for its certification by the ATA (Read our announcement published in ATA’s Newsbriefs here). The benefits of this certification include:

1. Ensures the quality of Farsi translations and interpretations and allows our community to safeguard the Farsi language and join the other major languages already certified by the ATA. 

2. Contributes to greater confidence in the quality and credibility of our profession, the recognition of our commitment to the profession and its ethical practice and greater visibility in the ATA directory. 

3. Creates a distinction that puts certified translators in a better position to market themselves and engage with others in their professional community for further development in all areas. 

4. The ATA certification can open doors to new business opportunities and higher compensations for certified Farsi translators and interpreters. 

The process for establishing a certification for a language pair is relatively straightforward and is described in the guide provided by the ATA. Our workgroup has already covered most of the initial steps and we are now reaching out to you to support this endeavor. 

At this point, we need to collect 50 signatures. Signatories are simply declaring their interest in taking the certification exam for the Farsi-English language pairing. Please note that this does not involve any cost or obligation for the signatories. Your signature is simply a testament to the demand in the Farsi-speaking community for reliable professional translation services.

Participation from Farsi translators will shift the status quo, both in terms of leveraging campaigns for our work and the pairing’s recognition by the organization. Our journey toward ATA Certification begins here, so don’t delay! Sign up here to be included in our list of supporters and to receive important updates about the certification. Act now and Sign Up

Know Your Interpreter

Know Your Interpreter by Sepideh MoussaviRecently, the American Translators Association (ATA) reprinted a news brief from the Associated Press in its newsletter. It concerned translation for the armed forces overseas — and should serve as a cautionary tale to anyone looking for a translator or interpreter. Continue reading “Know Your Interpreter”

Google Translate: Friend or Foe?

 

Google Translate: Friend or Foe? by Sepideh Moussavi

Recently I put a Farsi-language ad in a Facebook group that said:

If anyone needs any type of translation to and from Farsi, Please contact us at (212) 304- 4400. With over 25 years of experience in translation we have produced books, articles, and document translations to individuals and professionals all over the world. For a list of our services visit https://farsilanguagecenter.com/services/

Email: info@farsilanguagecenter.com

Website: https://farsilanguagecenter.com

Member of the American Translators Association (ATA)

Within 24 hours, somebody wrote a comment saying, “OR, you can use Google Translate, which is free.” Continue reading “Google Translate: Friend or Foe?”

Scam Alert: Fraudsters Target Interpreters and Clients

Scam Alert: Fraudsters Target Interpreters and Clients by Sepideh MoussaviPerpetrators of business fraud are getting more sophisticated everyday, and the translating and interpreting field is no exception. All the familiar scams involving everything from impersonated or “spoof” email accounts to “overpayments” with counterfeit checks are present in this industry. As problematic as schemes like that are, today I want to talk about a different kind of business fraud: CV or resume theft. Continue reading “Scam Alert: Fraudsters Target Interpreters and Clients”

Ethical Considerations for Interpreters

Ethical Considerations for Interpreters by Sepideh MoussaviToday, I wanted to address ethics and ethical considerations in my practice. It’s a very important part of our practice, mainly because I work in the courts. However, I would like to stress that having a very strong sense of ethics is important for all translators and interpreters, even if they don’t work in a legal setting. Continue reading “Ethical Considerations for Interpreters”

Four Things to Know About Our Practice

Four Things to Know About Our Practice by Sepideh MoussaviI’m lucky to be a translator and an interpreter. My work is an intellectual exercise that reveals to me the common concepts that underlie the grammar of my three languages (Farsi, French, and English). In this post I would like to address some common questions we field “in the trenches” at The Farsi Language Center, on any given day. I hope it answers some of your questions, too! Continue reading “Four Things to Know About Our Practice”